Editor's note: Jim Ditmore is a senior VP of IT infrastructure and operations at Allstate. He is a regular contributor to I&T's sister site InformationWeek.

A recent Intel study shows that the compute load that required 184 single-core processors in 2005 now can be handled with just 21 processors, where every nine servers gets replaced by one. For 40 years, technology rode Moore's Law to yield ever-more-powerful processors at lower cost. Its compounding effect was astounding: One of the best analogies is that we now have more processing power in a smartphone than the Apollo astronauts had when they landed on the moon. At the same time, though, the electrical power requirements for those processors continued to increase at a similar rate as the increase in transistor count. While new technologies (CMOS, for example) provided a one-time step-down in power requirements, each turn-up in processor frequency and density resulted in similar power increases. Read full story on InformationWeek


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